Anatomy of the pulp-chamber floor

By Krasner P, Rankow H

Date: 01/2004
Journal: Journal of Endodontics,

Summary:

•Purpose: To observe the anatomy of the pulp chamber and pulp chamber floor, to see if consistent land marks exist and are quantifiable, so a systematic approach for locating canal orifices can be built.

•Purpose: To observe the anatomy of the pulp chamber and pulp chamber floor, to see if consistent land marks exist and are quantifiable, so a systematic approach for locating canal orifices can be built.

•Inclusion criteria:

•Maxillary and mandibular anteriors, premolars and molars

•Teeth with virgin crowns, small or large restorations, metal and porcelain crowns and caries were included.

•Materials/Methods:

•Sample: 500 extracted permanent teeth (maxillary and mandibular anteriors, premolars and molars with different crown conditions)

•the crowns of 400 teeth were sectioned horizontally at the level of CEJ, 100 teeth were sectioned longitudinally in a buccolingual or mesiodistal direction.

•Two independent examiners observed each specimen for anatomical relationships of the pulp chamber and canal orifices, consistent patterns were recorded.

Most highlighted Results:

Two categories of anatomical patterns were observed:

 1. relationships of the pulp chamber to the clinical crown: law of centrality, law of concentricity

 2. relationships of the canal orifices on the pulp chamber floor: laws of symmetry 1&2 and laws of canal orifices 1,2 & 3

Clinical significance:

:The results provide a guide for proper access extension and identification of canal numbers and positions, they aid in prevention of errors and decrease the potential for treatment failure.

Left: laws of centrality (above) and concentricity (below) Right: Cut specimen and diagram  showing the laws of symmetry 1 and 2 and orifice location 1, 2, and 3.